Galatoire’s Cookbook


The Galatorire's Cookbook

Over 100 years of fine dining with Birmingham roots.

by John-Bryan Hopkins

Did you know that one of the most influential culinary institutions of New Orleans began its life here? Originally opening in Birmingham, Galatoire’s moved to Chicago before arriving in New Orleans around 1905.
Jean Galatoire from the small village of Pardies, France, brought recipes and traditions inspired by the familial dining style of his homeland to create the menu and ambiance of this now world-renowned restaurant.
Unlike most modern restaurants, Galatoire’s cuisine is not the creation of a singular superstar chef but rather of a family that has carefully safeguarded its traditions of impeccable cuisine, service and ambiance. Consistently providing this exquisite experience is itself an art.
Galatoire’s traditions have been preserved with little change through the decades. There has, however, been a slight modification of the restaurant’s once impenetrable policy of no reservations. Known for years by its characteristic line snaking down Bourbon Street, patrons would wait for hours just to get a table— especially on Fridays.
The Galatorire’s Cookbook reminds me of what a “real” cookbook should be. Beautifully bound, endpapers recalling the fleur du lis wallpaper that graces the restaurant, stunning color photographs of the venue and the amazing food and a text that takes us on a century long journey all combine to remind us why we collect cookbooks. This one belongs in your kitchen, or if you aren’t a cook, then by your bedside!

Did you know that one of the most influential culinary institutions of New Orleans began its life here? Originally opening in Birmingham, Galatoire’s moved to Chicago before arriving in New Orleans around 1905.  Jean Galatoire from the small village of Pardies, France, brought recipes and traditions inspired by the familial dining style of his homeland to create the menu and ambiance of this now world-renowned restaurant.  Unlike most modern restaurants, Galatoire’s cuisine is not the creation of a singular superstar chef but rather of a family that has carefully safeguarded its traditions of impeccable cuisine, service and ambiance. Consistently providing this exquisite experience is itself an art.Galatoire’s traditions have been preserved with little change through the decades. There has, however, been a slight modification of the restaurant’s once impenetrable policy of no reservations. Known for years by its characteristic line snaking down Bourbon Street, patrons would wait for hours just to get a table— especially on Fridays. The Galatorire’s Cookbook reminds me of what a “real” cookbook should be. Beautifully bound, endpapers recalling the fleur du lis wallpaper that graces the restaurant, stunning color photographs of the venue and the amazing food and a text that takes us on a century long journey all combine to remind us why we collect cookbooks. This one belongs in your kitchen, or if you aren’t a cook, then by your bedside!

John Bryan Hopkins aka The Foodimentary Guy is one of the nations leading experts in new media and social networking focused on food facts, fine dining and the slow food movement. He has well over 100,000 loyal followers on Twitter as @foodimentary and blogs as The Foodimenatry Guy for a number of websites including myrecipes.com and al.com

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